252 349-0049 write to: Jack@NewBernFineArt.com
Copyright © 2020, John H. Anglin, All Rights Reserved.All images herein are the protected intellectual property of John H. Anglin.For licensing information contact Jack Anglin at the number or the email address above.
I’m enjoying my new paintings, I do hope you like them! Below are other recent images of my works, some related to where I’m living in New Bern, North Carolina, -it’s a beautiful little town along the Neuse River.
Fort Macon Jetty No. 1 oil on linen 36” X 24” $2400 unframed I’ve enjoyed watching this area at Atlantic Beach, near the public beach access at Fort Macon. Fortunately, I got to see it several times over a few weeks before a recent storm filled up some of the beach and rocks. It’s not completely covered, but not as interesting as it's depicted here. That’s the way it is at the beach, it changes all the time. I’ll keep watching and painting different views of this pretty scramble of rocks and water. Along our sandy North Carolina beaches, there aren’t too many features like this. Please be sure to see my other paintings of this jetty below. There is a larger jetty closer to Beaufort Inlet, that’s next on my list. This piece is my most recent, and I have several more underway and planned for similar views at different times of day. The Impressionist Claude Monet enjoyed repeating his subjects and I certainly understand why. First off, the scene grabs an artist’s attention for the composition or some feature that makes it intriguing, and then next, having already studied it and painted it once, the artist comprehends many of the elements, and better understands what we are looking at! Therefore, repeating the subject in a different light or at another time of year makes sense. It's a lot of fun, too!
Fort Macon Jetty No. 2 oil on linen 36” X 24” $1500 unframed This jetty image is the view looking southwest, and depicts a rather calm day with long lines of waves and suds. The more I study water, it amazes me how such long lines can be naturally created. But the rocks interrupt the extended pipes of swells and almost bend the surf. I love seeing how the former wave expires on the sand, which is then still wet enough to have an edge and yet a few bubbles remain, and then the final damp, shiny sand is just about to disappear and submerge into the sand. I included a shrimp boat pulling a net on the left horizon. As stated above, this is one of a set of new paintings, six so far.
Fort Macon Jetty / Looking East oil on canvas 36” X 24” $1200 unframed This view of the jetty is from near the steps at the visitor center, and looking east towards Beaufort Inlet. Beyond the jetty are the channel markers, and then you can see Shackleford Banks. Not visible is the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, which is further in the distance. The angular aspects of the beach and the lines of the surf, along with the strata of clouds are such interesting elements to consider and work with for the composition. How we see and remember the beach and water is complicated, as it’s usually an overwhelming visual stimulus that changes every second. It is for me!
Fort Macon Jetty No. 3 oil on canvas 20” X 16” $900 unframed Here is a closer view of the same rocks as bove, with a mild sea but still active enough to provide a nice curling wave and a minor splash. This painting shows the very smooth, colorful sand, a beach feature as interesting as the water. I see an entire spectrum of color in all of these scenes, some colors not so bright or obvious, but still present for those with eyes to see. It's also a matter of knowing where to look to expect colors, something that comes with experience and observation. I’m game to continue learning things and enjoying these sights.
Fort Macon Jetty / With Lovers? oil on linen 30” X 20” in progress One morning I was fortunate to witness two young people standing on the rocks. I saw them from a distance and didn’t bother them, but as I looked back from the steps of the visitors center steps, I noticed they were still there. I decided to return and approach them, telling them that I had some great shots of them and would be happy to share those. They were pleased about that, and agreed to actually pose for me shooting from the east side with better, brighter light. We corresponded, and I asked if I had witnessed a proposal? Turns out they were just reveling in the day and praying together, enjoying a special moment, almost alone on the beach. I will include their figures in this piece, painting them standing on the rocks on the right side. I may decide to paint another version of this one, but much larger. Stand by for an update when it's beyond this early underpainting stage.
The New Bern Waterfront oil on canvas 24” X 36 $1200 unframed One of the well known scenes along the Neuse River, and in and near downtown New Bern, is the walking path near the gazebo at Union Point Park. This view is from the boat ramp area, often busy with hungry ducks and seagulls waiting for someone to buy them feed pellets. The trees are always pretty, even in the winter. And the clouds and water are different every single time I visit.
Cupid (Eros) with the Black Eye oil on linen 24” X 36” $3600 framed A Valentine’s Day special offering! After a beautiful, famous 18th century sculpture, and I’ve added a few things, including a pretty nice shiner. Why? Because Cupid (the Roman name), or Eros (the Greek name) is actually a meddler, or as I like to say, “He’s a little prick!” Few people know the mythology about this god, especially missing is the awareness that he carried two types of arrows. One arrow would slay the victim with a burning love or desire, the other arrow could extinguish the most inflamed passion. So I think he deserves a black eye, and since he meddled not just among humans but dared to tweak things among his fellow and sister gods, well, certainly one of them would have reacted accordingly, even though he is usually depicted as a charming little cherub.
The New Bern Lighthouse pastel on cotton paper / 18” x 22“ $900 unframed Few people know there was once a lighthouse near the New Bern waterfront and Union Point. Long gone, this is probably how it might look today with the park built up around it and the bridges seen in the distance. It is similar in size to the Ocracoke and Bald Head lighthouses, since it did not need to cast a long light to sea. Coastal towers warn of long shoals stretching far out to sea. Sailors used to say that if you could see the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse beacon, you were too close to shore and already in grave danger. Accordingly, the New Bern Lighthouse had a smaller order Fresnel lens and was not decorated with a pattern like the coastal towers.
Sharing the Bounty / Fishing at Salmon Falls oil on linen 30” X 40” for sale, call! The real place is in Massachusetts, at what is now called Shelbourne Falls, west of Greenfield. It’s a spectacular falls area below an old dam, with large potholes and worn rocks revealing interesting strata of many colors. Downstream there are more dams along the Connecticut River, and no Atlantic Salmon are found in places like this where they once were bountiful--the dams have prevented fish migration and spawning since the mid 1800s. Native Americans fished and hunted this area, and considered it a neutral place where there would be no fighting or wrangling for control. There was always enough fish and game for both humans and animals, which is why I’ve included native fishermen along with a bear family. They coexist, but have a powerful stream separating them. I imagine it could have been like this. Don’t you?
Portraits in oil and pastel by Jack Anglin I’m very interested in making large, beautiful works of art. Perhaps we can connect for the creation of a special painting, portrait, or a gift commission?  Let’s talk! I’m an easy person to talk with, not your stereotypical artist, and I possess a wide range of skill and many techniques, plus an amazing amount of creativity to serve you!
All of the many famous artists we so admire relied on patrons to help them make their great works of art. What could the two of us accomplish? Thanks for taking time to visit here and view my art!  -Jack Anglin
above -lifesize oil on linen below -a lifesize pastel,
252 349-0049 write to: Jack@NewBernFineArt.com
Copyright © 2020, John H. Anglin, All Rights Reserved.All images herein are the protected intellectual property of John H. Anglin.For licensing information contact Jack Anglin at the number or the email address above.
Fort Macon Jetty / Looking East oil on canvas 36” X 24” $1200 unframed This view of the jetty is from near the steps at the visitor center, and looking east towards Bogue Inlet. Beyond the jetty are the channel markers, and then you can see Shackleford Banks, ~Cape Lookout is further in the distance. The angular aspects of the beach and the lines of the surf, along with the strata of clouds are such interesting elements to consider and work with for the composition. How we see and remember the beach and water is complicated, as it’s a usually overwhelming visual stimulus that changes every second. it is for me.
I’m enjoying my new paintings, I do hope you like them. Below are other recent images of my works, some related to where I’m living in New Bern, North Carolina, -it’s a beautiful little town along the Neuse River.
Fort Macon Jetty No. 1 oil on linen 36” X 24” $2400 unframed I’ve enjoyed watching this area at Atlantic Beach, near the public beach access at Fort Macon. Fortunately, I got to see it several times over a few weeks before a recent storm filled up some of the beach and rocks. It’s not completely covered, but not as interesting as it's depicted here. That’s the way it is at the beach, it changes all the time. I’ll keep watching and painting different views of this pretty scramble of rocks and water. Along our sandy North Carolina beaches, there aren’t too many features like this. Please be sure to see my other paintings of this jetty below. There is a larger jetty closer to Beaufort Inlet, that’s next on my list. This piece is my most recent, and I have several more underway and planned for similar views at different times of day. The Impressionist Claude Monet enjoyed repeating his subjects and I certainly understand why. First off, the scene grabs an artist’s attention for the composition or some feature that makes it intriguing, and then next, having already studied it and painted it once, the artist comprehends many of the elements, and better understands what we are looking at! Therefore, repeating the subject in a different light or at another time of year makes sense. It's a lot of fun, too!
Fort Macon Jetty No. 2 oil on linen 36” X 24” $1500 unframed This jetty image is the view looking southwest, and depicts a rather calm day with long lines of waves and suds. The more I study water, it amazes me how such long lines can be naturally created. But the rocks interrupt the extended pipes of swells and almost bend the surf. I love seeing how the former wave expires on the sand, which is then still wet enough to have an edge and yet a few bubbles remain, and then the final damp, shiny sand is just about to disappear and submerge into the sand. I included a shrimp boat pulling a net on the left horizon. As stated above, this is one of a set of new paintings, six so far.
Fort Macon Jetty No. 3 oil on canvas 20” X 16” $900 unframed Here is a closer view of the same rocks as bove, with a mild sea but still active enough to provide a nice curling wave and a minor splash. This painting shows the very smooth, colorful sand, a beach feature as interesting as the water. I see an entire spectrum of color in all of these scenes, some colors not so bright or obvious, but still present for those with eyes to see. It's also a matter of knowing where to look to expect colors, something that comes with experience and observation. I’m game to continue learning things and enjoying these sights.
Fort Macon Jetty / With Lovers? oil on linen 30” X 20” in progress One morning I was fortunate to witness two young people standing on the rocks. I saw them from a distance and didn’t bother them, but as I looked back from the steps of the visitors center steps, I noticed they were still there. I decided to return and approach them, telling them that I had some great shots of them and would be happy to share those. They were pleased about that, and agreed to actually pose for me shooting from the east side with better, brighter light. We corresponded, and I asked if I had witnessed a proposal? Turns out they were just reveling in the day and praying together, enjoying a special moment, almost alone on the beach. I will include their figures in this piece, painting them standing on the rocks on the right side. I may decide to paint another version of this one, but much larger. Stand by for an update when it's beyond this early underpainting stage.
The New Bern Waterfront oil on canvas 24” X 36 $1200 unframed One of the well known scenes along the Neuse River, and in and near downtown New Bern, is the walking path near the gazebo at Union Point Park. This view is from the boat ramp area, often busy with hungry ducks and seagulls waiting for someone to buy them feed pellets. The trees are always pretty, even in the winter. And the clouds and water are different every single time I visit.
Cupid (Eros) with the Black Eye oil on linen 24” X 36” $3600 framed A Valentine’s Day special offering! After a beautiful, famous 18th century sculpture, and I’ve added a few things, including a pretty nice shiner. Why? Because Cupid (the Roman name), or Eros (the Greek name) is actually a meddler, or as I like to say, “He’s a little prick!” Few people know the mythology about this god, especially missing is the awareness that he carried two types of arrows. One arrow would slay the victim with a burning love or desire, the other arrow could extinguish the most inflamed passion. So I think he deserves a black eye, and since he meddled not just among humans but dared to tweak things among his fellow and sister gods, well, certainly one of them would have reacted accordingly, even though he is usually depicted as a charming little cherub.
The New Bern Lighthouse pastel on cotton paper / 18” x 22“ $900 unframed Few people know there was once a lighthouse near the New Bern waterfront and Union Point. Long gone, this is probably how it might look today with the park built up around it and the bridges seen in the distance. It is similar in size to the Ocracoke and Bald Head lighthouses, since it did not need to cast a long light to sea. Coastal towers warn of long shoals stretching far out to sea. Sailors used to say that if you could see the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse beacon, you were too close to shore and already in grave danger. Accordingly, the New Bern Lighthouse had a smaller order Fresnel lens and was not decorated with a pattern like the coastal towers.
Sharing the Bounty / Fishing at Salmon Falls oil on linen 30” X 40” for sale, call! The real place is in Massachusetts, at what is now called Shelbourne Falls, west of Greenfield. It’s a spectacular falls area below an old dam, with large potholes and worn rocks revealing interesting strata of many colors. Downstream there are more dams along the Connecticut River, and no Atlantic Salmon are found in places like this where they once were bountiful--the dams have prevented fish migration and spawning since the mid 1800s. Native Americans fished and hunted this area, and considered it a neutral place where there would be no fighting or wrangling for control. There was always enough fish and game for both humans and animals, which is why I’ve included native fishermen along with a bear family. They coexist, but have a powerful stream separating them. I imagine it could have been like this. Don’t you?
Portraits in oil and pastel by Jack Anglin I’m very interested in making large, beautiful works of art. Perhaps we can connect for the creation of a special painting, portrait, or a gift commission?  Let’s talk! I’m an easy person to talk with, not your stereotypical artist, and I possess a wide range of skill and many techniques, plus an amazing amount of creativity to serve you!
above -lifesize oil on linen below -a lifesize pastel,
All of the many famous artists we so admire relied on patrons to help them make their great works of art. What could the two of us accomplish? Thanks for taking time to visit here and view my art!  -Jack Anglin