252 349-0049 write to: Jack@NewBernFineArt.com
Copyright © 2020, John H. Anglin, All Rights Reserved.All images herein are the protected intellectual property of John H. Anglin.For licensing information contact Jack Anglin at the number or the email address above.
I’m interested in making large, beautiful works of art. Perhaps we can connect for the creation of a special painting, portrait, or a gift commission? Let’s talk! I’m an easy person to talk with, not your stereotypical artist, and I possess a wide range of skill and techniques, and an amazing amount of creativity! All of the classic artists we so admire relied on patrons to help them make their great works of art. What could the two of us accomplish? -Jack To the left is one of my life size oil portraits See more of my portrait work HERE!
about the artist,…
Featured here is Jack Anglin, (John Henry Anglin) He’s lived in Eastern NC for over 25 years, with some recent time away in: Virginia Beach, VA; St. Croix (the US Virgin Islands); Chapel Hill & Durham; Newport, Rhode Island; and Greenfield, Massachussetts. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, Jack semed to gravitate toward the water early on. While in college, Jack sketched portraits for two summers on the Boardwalk in Wildwood, NJ. After graduating in 1976, Jack headed west to California and ended up in Newport Beach and working on Balboa Island.
Jack studied Graphic Art at La Roche College in Pittsburgh, earning a B.S. through shared experience with The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. Frankly, it wasn’t the best path, as the artist always was more interested in illustration and fine art than commercial projects, but the background has been an asset as the world of art has changed and so much is digital. And, much of the painter’s growth is just in the doing and experience, so no regrets! Jack speaking now,… Below is one of my first paintings, a hobo, or it is me running away from home? Maybe just a wanderer, someone with a “loose foot”as the old folks used to say.
Art was my avenue to excel at something as a kid. I loved to draw and paint, and had a vivid imagination. Most kids do, and all are artists until a certain age. But I stuck with it, and therefore was given the art tasks, chalkboard decorations and signage, the mimeograph newsletter to produce, and all kinds of ‘art’ assignments in school. I won a city wide Humane Society poster award in the second grade, the blue ribbon ‘Certificate of Merit’. From then on I was really the family artist. Birthdays and Christmas brought me an abundance of art supplies. This framed award always hung in my bedroom, reminding me I could at least do something right. My poster that won was no big deal, but it won this city wide competition and opened up doors for me. Funny how things shape a life, the various twists and turns. I love that line, “Kindness makes A Happy World”! Indeed! Many people have been kind to me!
After college I headed west. I had an offer to work for the same person with whom I had worked for the two previous summers in New Jersey. Pat was opening a new store on Balboa Island and I was going to help and see what I could do there as an artist. It was a great summer, and we tried many things, but the shop was a bust, and by the end of the summer I needed to move on. I was doing fine, at least not still in Pittsburgh working somewhere doing paste up graphic design, and I was far away from my mom, a very necessary step. Along with another artist that was working with us on Balboa Island, we responded to an ad for portrait artists needed in Las Vegas, and within a week or so, Mike and I headed to Vegas and fell into a decent gig at the Aladdin Hotel. I ended up working in many of the hotels: The MGM Grand (I lost a lot of things in that tragic fire), The Dunes, The Holiday Inn & Casino, The Frontier, Circus Circus, downtown at The Four Queens, and a long gig at The Tropicana. At all these places I sketched live and made some very nice pastel portraits of patrons over about a six year period. I had another summer back in California around 1979, that time in Venice Beach, also known as Muscle Beach. See? The water again! In Venice I could view the ocean from the apartment window and ran on the beach most mornings with my good buddy, Rick Parks, a great artist and friend. Here’s a photo of me with my sweet dad when he visited in Las Vegas, circa 1980. I actually was getting a permanent for the curls! Good thing there was no YouTube back then! The city was fun (I was a good boy, really!), but the desert all around was wonderful. My friends and I hiked all the mountains near the city, and I was all over the state, and often up to Zion National Park in Utah, and out to Lake Mead. My artistic development was underway, and I had made some good strides and developed great friendships along that path. I wanted to grow and improve, and drawing live sketch portraiture is one very good way to do that. Some nights in Wildwood I would make 30 sketches, and In Vegas some of my best work was accomplished in around just an hour. Below is an example of the kind of charcoal sketches I made in Wildwood.
My work in Las Vegas was in color, in pastels --with quality color pigments on decent cotton paper. Below are two of my samples that hung in the Aladdin Hotel --they got me a lot of business, and helped other artists, too! I could do five portraits a day.
Suzanne Somers from a TV Guide cover photo 16”X20” pastel on Canson paper
Linda Ronstadt 18”X24” pastel on Canson paper
Personal Details -My History! I was raised as a Roman Catholic, and almost always had a sense of peace about the Divine moving in my life. But my religious upbringing also presented many problems for me and lots of guilt along with misunderstandings. While living and working in Las Vegas I had a religious awakening and fell into a sweet fellowship with many people my own age. We spent a lot of time together and had great fun, but I pushed the envelope of understanding and was in need of more answers to the dangerous questions I was posing. The beloved pastor was handling me with kid gloves, as I was on semi-heretical ground and could have gotten him fired for even dealing with some of these normal things, like the evolution/creation debate, miracles, etc. In fact, those things came back to bite me decades later. I regret it took going to seminary to find a mature and reasonable way to understand what was earlier an indoctination. To make a long story short, I ended up attending a small Christian college in Oregon for a year (as an exploration of my academic possibilities --my undergraduate degree was in art, after all). There I was accepted to Brite Divinity School at TCU in Fort Worth where I lived from 1982 until 1986. I have a Masters in Divinity with an Education concentration from TCU and I am an ordained minister in The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). I loved seminary and ate up all the subjects and offerings, and did fairly well. Brite is heavily endowed, so I was able to get through a long masters degree without accumulating massive dept. It was a great experience, and one I realized not everyone in the church could have, so I made it a point to always try to bring the level of quality education to the congregations I served, something not usually found in mainline churches. What people study in real accredited seminaries is very different from what is found and heard from most pulpits, on the radio and TV, and in the religious bookstores. My message was frequently received by many thankful people as truly good news without the baloney, but of course, it was also held suspect and too challenging for many others. I served churches for over thirty years but had some difficult experiences along the way. I’m now retired and inactive from ministry, and quite happy about it. After graduating in 1986, I started out as a full time associate minister, then a full time pastor in a small town for thee years, and after that went to a bi-vocational arrangement where I started painting more and developing as a fine artist while serving churches in a part-time capacity. It was a good thing not to have all my eggs in one basket, as churches can be quite fickle and they fire clergy without too much care over the difficulty in quickly relocating one’s family. My wife (now my ex) was an organist, too, actually working in a different church, so that served well for the family stability. We lived in the Kinston area for around 25 years, and were happy for most of that time. I had a studio in the Community Council for The Arts in downtown Kinston for several years, then worked out of Sarahurst, a 100 year old mansion we had as our family home and my working studio. Here’s that beautiful old home we loved for ten years --I liked living there but I’ve got that “old house” thing out of my system! Here she is--what a sweet time we had there! It was a fun house to use to entertain, with great circulation and a wonderful porch! Things changed at my ex’s church in 2011, the feeble leadership which was grasping at straws decided that what needed fixing was the music, and like so many uncreative clergy, the solution offered was a “contemporary” service. I encountered that idea many times in my ministry, usually it means old hippies wanting to sing 1970’s era Kumbaya style stuff and having a venue for themselves and other amateur musicians to goof around. My ex had her Doctorate in Organ Performance, and defied that nonsensical change, and wouldn’t go along with it, so after 23 years at that church and 25 years in the area, it was time for us to go. Maybe it was overdue?   It was a sad thing to leave Kinston, but I quickly found a church in Virginia Beach (see, water again) and that was fun for a while. We had a decent piece of property for a church, but it was a very run down and neglected facility, just sprucing it up was a disgraceful thing and embarassing to those who had charge of it previously. We also had comprehensive asbestos issues, so we abatted that and gutted the entire church. The church had incorporated a failed downtown Norfolk congregation, so we had plenty of money but were wise and careful about the changes. The remodeling was beautiful and had some state of the art features -- much ahead of the curve. But like what had happened before, a few simple minded folk got greedy and believed I was not biblical or relevant enough for their conservative taste, so that ended poorly, and it was my last straw, too.   above: I became a volunteer EMT in VA Beach, and enjoyed running rescue and helping save lives. Here I’m driving an ambulance while still a student and under scrutiny and in training. I painted as much as I could, was in two good galleries in VA Beach and Norfolk, but things were much too quiet in general. I looked for other work but chances of anyone hiring a 60 year old man, regardless of skill and qualifications, are grim. The financial toll had an effect on our marriage, and we separated and then were divorced later in 2016. I decided to try something completely different and headed off to Saint Croix in the US Virgin Islands in May of 2016. My hope was to make it as an artist there, and I was in two good galleries, but the economy and tourism was changing, business was bleak, and if not for house sitting and pet sitting, I never would have made it. I returned to the mainland in 2017 and was involved in several relationships, I’m really what I define as 'serially monogamous', not a player, but was looking for a good woman and committed relationship. My journey brought me through West Virginia, Chapel Hill, Durham, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, and back to North Carolina. I have been house sitting, always painted, and continually tried to grow and expand my horizons as an artist and a decent human, trying new things and being as authentic a person as I could. It’s been an interesting life and an amazing few years! About my preferred media,.. OIL PAINTINGS are usually made on stretched fabric of fine canvas or high quality linen that enable larger surfaces to be created than you could find in papers or practical wood panels. The fabrics used for paintings have a wide range of thread thickness, thread count, and finished textures. Generally speaking, oil paints allow more time for the artist to blend and work the paint before they actually set up and harden. Oils also offer superior colors, not so artificially bright. After drying, the texture provided by the manner in which the paint was applied can provide a rich surface over which more paint is easily and readily received. Oils also have a wonderful depth and natural beauty and provide the artist the ability to work in layers and transparent glazes with varnishes and other media. The way Jack uses oil paints varies with each painting. A tremendous amount of effects are possible by using thick and thin paint and by mixing techniques. His oil portraits are characteristically smooth when it comes to the face, skin and other soft elements. Recently they have taken on more texture with under-painting and are very expressive--especially concerning the background and other parts of the painting. Jack strives to use high quality pigments that are recommended to be compatible with other paint components and mediums. His palette uses colors recommended by contemporary and traditional artists and experts who have taken seriously the problem of choosing paint and pigments (it's a chemistry set, after all). Jack's choice of colors are less likely to crack or fade since they are selected by examining the chemical composition and the compatibility of all the pigments that could be used together. "Oil paints are so wonderful to use! If I could only adequately convey the thrill of seeing a painting take shape with oil paint." _____________________________ PASTEL is a traditional and time tested medium that has so very much to offer. There are several misconceptions about pastels. First--pastels are not chalks! Chalk is calcite ( CaCO3 ) made from fossil sea creatures, and such as what is used in school to mark on the chalk board. In fact, pastels are made with the same pigments used in expensive watercolor, acrylic, and oil paints. As with other media, pastels are available in a wide range of qualities from a variety of manufacturers. A binder such as glycerin is added to a finely ground powder of pure pigment to keep the pastels held together and solid in a stick form after drying. Pastels differ from other media in that they require no other chemicals or additives. Some pastel artists use a fixative, a sticky lacquer, to help attach one layer of pastel to another. I prefer to use pastels dry and use no fixatives or sprays during painting or as a final cover spray. Pastels are made on paper, board, or panel --usually, my choice is a 100% cotton "rag" paper available in a medium weight and in quite a few colors. Since few chemicals are added to the color mix in my pastels, and the 'paper' is 100% acid free,  the 'pastel painting' has a long life when framed using contemporary preservation techniques. When you see any of the impressionist's works that were done in pastel, and you realize the beauty of their color as well as the high quality of their present state, then you can see why today pastel is still a choice medium used by professionals all over the world. All that is required to keep the pastel painting safe is for it to be framed under glass, with a mat to keep it from contact with the glass, and a sealed paper backing. Ultraviolet radiation will affect any pigment in any media, so it is best to frame art with a UV protective glass. New kinds of glass and acrylics are available that are superior to the old non- glare glass and includes a UV screen --which is my preference for all my pastel paintings. I'll be happy to speak about any ideas or questions you might have concerning portraiture. I’ve learned how to make it a fun and fantastic experience for all concerned. Let’s get started!
On Saint Croix, in Christiansted above: working on an oil portrait at The TOP HAT GALLERY below: Much of my work at a show at THE HENLE STUDIO FINE ART GALLERY
252 349-0049 write to: Jack@NewBernFineArt.com
Copyright © 2020, John H. Anglin, All Rights Reserved.All images herein are the protected intellectual property of John H. Anglin.For licensing information contact Jack Anglin at the number or the email address above.
I’m interested in making large, beautiful works of art. Perhaps we can connect for the creation of a special painting, portrait, or a gift commission? Let’s talk! I’m an easy person to talk with, not your stereotypical artist, and I possess a wide range of skill and techniques, and an amazing amount of creativity! All of the classic artists we so admire relied on patrons to help them make their great works of art. What could the two of us accomplish? Thanks for taking time to visit! -Jack This is one of my life size oil portraits, on fine smooth linen. See Jack’s Portrait work HERE!
about the artist,…
Featured here is John Henry Anglin, mostly known as Jack Jack lived in Eastern NC for over 25 years, with some recent time away in: Virginia Beach, VA; St. Croix (the US Virgin Islands); Chapel Hill & Durham; Newport, Rhode Island; and Greenfield, Massachussetts. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, Jack semed to gravitate toward water early on. While in college Jack sketched portraits for two summers on the Boardwalk in Wildwood, NJ. After graduating in 1976, Jack headed west to California and ended up in Newport Beach and working on Balboa Island.
Jack studied Graphic Art at La Roche College in Pittsburgh, earning a B.S. through shared experience with The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. Frankly, it wasn’t the best path, as the artist always was more interested in illustration and fine art than commercial projects, but the background has been an asset as the world of art has changed and so much is digital. And, much of the painter’s growth is just in the doing and experience, so no regrets! Jack speaking now,… Below is one of my first paintings, a hobo, or it is me running away from home? Maybe just a wanderer, someone with a “loose foot”as the old folk used to say.
Art was my avenue to excel at something as a kid. I loved to draw and paint, and had a vivid imagination. Most kids do, and all are artists until a certain age. But I stuck with it, and therefore was given the art tasks, chalkboard decorations and signage, the mimeograph newsletter to produce, and all kinds of ‘art’ assignments in school. I won a city wide Humane Society poster award in the second grade, the blue ribbon ‘Certificate of Merit’. From then on I was really the family artist. Birthdays and Christmas brought me an abundance of art supplies. This framed award always hung in my bedroom, reminding me I could at least do something right. My poster that won was no big deal, but it won this city wide competition and opened up doors for me. Funny how things shape a life, the various twists and turns. I love that line, “Kindness makes A Happy World”! Indeed! Many people have been kind to me!
After college I headed west. I had an offer to work for the same person with whom I had worked for the two previous summers in New Jersey. Pat was opening a new store on Balboa Island and I was going to help and see what I could do there as an artist. It was a great summer, and we tried many things, but the shop was a bust, and by the end of the summer I needed to move on. I was doing fine, at least not still in Pittsburgh working somewhere doing paste up graphic design, and I was far away from my mom, a very necessary step. Along with another artist that was working with us on Balboa Island, we responded to an ad for portrait artists needed in Las Vegas, and within a week or so, Mike and I headed to Vegas and fell into a decent gig at the Aladdin Hotel. I ended up working in many of the hotels: The MGM Grand (I lost a lot of things in that tragic fire), The Dunes, The Holiday Inn & Casino, The Frontier, Circus Circus, downtown at The Four Queens, and a long gig at The Tropicana. At all these places I sketched live and made some very nice pastel portraits of patrons over about a six year period. I had another summer back in California around 1979, that time in Venice Beach, also known as Muscle Beach. See? The water again! In Venice I could view the ocean from the apartment window and ran on the beach most mornings with my good buddy, Rick Parks, a great artist and friend. Here’s a photo of me with my sweet dad when he visited in Vegas, circa 1980. I was actually getting a permanent for the curls! Good thing there was no YouTube back then! The city was fun (I was a good boy, really!), but the desert all around was wonderful. My friends and I hiked all the mountains near the city, and I was all over the state, often up to Zion National Park in Utah, and out to Lake Mead. My artistic development was underway, and I had made some good strides and developed great friendships along that path. I wanted to grow and improve, and drawing live sketch portraiture is one very good way to do that. Some nights in Wildwood I would make 30 sketches, and In Vegas some of my best work was accomplished in around just an hour. Below is an example of the kind of charcoal sketches I made in Wildwood.
My work in Las Vegas was in color, in pastels - -quality color pigments on decent cotton paper. Below are two of my samples that hung in the Aladdin Hotel --they got me a lot of business, and helped other artists, too! I could do as many as five portraits a day.
Suzanne Somers from a TV Guide cover photo 16”X20” pastel on Canson paper
Linda Ronstadt 18”X24” pastel on Canson paper
Personal Details -My History! I was raised as a Roman Catholic, and almost always had a sense of peace about the divine in my life. But my religious upbringing also presented many problems for me and lots of guilt along with misunderstandings. While living and working in Las Vegas I had a religious awakening and fell into a sweet fellowship with many people my own age. We spent a lot of time together and had great fun, but I pushed the envelope of understanding and was in need of more answers to the dangerous questions I was posing. The beloved pastor was handling me with kid gloves, as I was on semi-heretical ground and could have got him fired for even dealing with some of these normal things, like the evolution/creation debate, miracles, etc. In fact, those things came back to bite me decades later. I regret it took going to seminary to find a mature and reasonable way to understand what was earlier an indoctination. To make a long story short, I ended up attending a small Christian college in Oregon for a year (as an exploration of my academic possibilities --my undergraduate degree was in art, after all). There I was accepted to Brite Divinity School at TCU in Fort Worth where I lived from 1982 until 1986. I have a Masters in Divinity with an Education concentration from TCU and I am an ordained minister in The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). I loved seminary and ate up all the subjects and offerings, and did fairly well. Brite is heavily endowed, so I was able to get through a long masters degree without accumulating massive dept. It was a great experience, and one I realized not everyone in the church could have, so I made it a point to always try to bring the level of quality education to the congregations I served, something not usually found in mainline churches. What people study in real accredited seminaries is very different from what is found and heard from most pulpits, on the radio and TV, and in the religious bookstores. My message was frequently received by many thankful people as truly good news without the baloney, but of course, it was also held suspect and too challenging for many others. I served churches for over thirty years but had some difficult experiences along the way. I’m now retired and inactive from ministry, and quite happy about it. After graduating in 1986, I started out as a full time associate minister, then a full time pastor in a small town for three years, and after that went to a bi-vocational arrangement where I started painting more and developing as a fine artist while serving churches in a part-time capacity. It was a good thing not to have all my eggs in one basket, as churches can be quite fickle and they fire clergy without too much care over the difficulty in quickly relocating one’s family. My wife (now my ex) was an organist, too, actually working in a different church, so that served well for the family stability. We lived in the Kinston area for around 25 years, and were happy for most of that time. I had a studio in the Community Council for The Arts in downtown Kinston for several years, then worked out of Sarahurst, a 100 year old mansion we had as our family home and my working studio.  Here’s that beautiful old home we loved for ten years --I liked living there but I’ve got that “old house” thing out of my system! Here she is--what a sweet time we had there! It was a fun house and we loved to entertain, it had great circulation! Things changed at my ex’s church in 2011, the feeble leadership which was grasping at straws decided that what needed fixing was the music, and like so many uncreative clergy, the solution offered was a “contemporary” service. I encountered that idea many times in my ministry, usually it means old hippies wanting to sing 1970’s era Kumbaya style stuff and having a venue for themselves and other amateur musicians to goof around. My ex had her Doctorate in Organ Performance, and defied that nonsensical change, and wouldn’t go along with it, so after 23 years at that church and 25 years in the area, it was time for us to go. Maybe it was overdue?   It was a sad thing to leave Kinston, but I quickly found a church in Virginia Beach (see, water again) and that was fun for a while. We had a decent piece of property for a church, but it was a very run down and neglected facility, just sprucing it up was a disgraceful thing and embarassing to those who had charge of it previously. We also had comprehensive asbestos issues, so we abatted that and gutted the entire church. The church had incorporated a failed downtown Norfolk congregation, so we had plenty of money but were wise and careful about the changes. The remodeling was beautiful and had some state of the art features --much ahead of the curve. But like what had happened before, a few simple minded folk got greedy and believed I was not biblical or relevant enough for their conservative taste, so that ended poorly, and it was my last straw, too.   above: I became a volunteer EMT in VA Beach, and enjoyed running rescue and helping save lives. Here I’m driving an ambulance while still a student and under scrutiny and in training. I painted as much as I could, was in two good galleries in VA Beach and Norfolk, but things were much too quiet in general. I looked for other work but chances of anyone hiring a 60 year old man, regardless of skill and qualifications, are grim. The financial toll had an effect on our marriage, and we separated and then were divorced later in 2016. I decided to try something completely different and headed off to Saint Croix in the US Virgin Islands in May of 2016. My hope was to make it as an artist there and I was in two galleries, but the economy and tourism was changing, business was bleak, and if not for house sitting I never would have made it. I returned to the mainland in 2017 and was involved in several relationships, I’m really what I define as 'serially monogamous', not a player, but was looking for a good woman and committed relationship. My journey brought me through West Virginia, Chapel Hill, Durham, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, and back to North Carolina. I have been house sitting, always painted, and continually tried to grow and expand my horizons as an artist and a decent human, trying new things and being as authentic a person as I could. It’s been an interesting life and an amazing few years! About my preferred media,.. OIL PAINTINGS are usually made on stretched fabric of fine canvas or high quality linen that enable larger surfaces to be created than you could find in papers or practical wood panels. The fabrics used for paintings have a wide range of thread thickness, thread count, and finished textures. Generally speaking, oil paints allow more time for the artist to blend and work the paint before they actually set up and harden. Oils also offer superior colors, not so artificially bright. After drying, the texture provided by the manner in which the paint was applied can provide a rich surface over which more paint is easily and readily received. Oils also have a wonderful depth and natural beauty and provide the artist the ability to work in layers and transparent glazes with varnishes and other media. The way Jack uses oil paints varies with each painting. A tremendous amount of effects are possible by using thick and thin paint and by mixing techniques. His oil portraits are characteristically smooth when it comes to the face, skin and other soft elements. Recently they have taken on more texture with under-painting and are very expressive-- especially concerning the background and other parts of the painting. Jack strives to use high quality pigments that are recommended to be compatible with other paint components and mediums. His palette uses colors recommended by contemporary and traditional artists and experts who have taken seriously the problem of choosing paint and pigments (it's a chemistry set, after all). Jack's choice of colors are less likely to crack or fade since they are selected by examining the chemical composition and the compatibility of all the pigments that could be used together. "Oil paints are so wonderful to use! If I could only adequately convey the thrill of seeing a painting take shape with oil paint." _____________________________ PASTEL is a traditional and time tested medium that has so very much to offer. There are several misconceptions about pastels. First--pastels are not chalks! Chalk is calcite ( CaCO3 ) made from fossil sea creatures, and such as what is used in school to mark on the chalk board. In fact, pastels are made with the same pigments used in expensive watercolor, acrylic, and oil paints. As with other media, pastels are available in a wide range of qualities from a variety of manufacturers. A binder such as glycerin is added to a finely ground powder of pure pigment to keep the pastels held together and solid in a stick form after drying. Pastels differ from other media in that they require no other chemicals or additives. Some pastel artists use a fixative, a sticky lacquer, to help attach one layer of pastel to another. I prefer to use pastels dry and use no fixatives or sprays during painting or as a final cover spray. Pastels are made on paper, board, or panel --usually, my choice is a 100% cotton "rag" paper available in a medium weight and in quite a few colors. Since few chemicals are added to the color mix in my pastels, and the 'paper' is 100% acid free,  the 'pastel painting' has a long life when framed using contemporary preservation techniques. When you see any of the impressionist's works that were done in pastel, and you realize the beauty of their color as well as the high quality of their present state, then you can see why today pastel is still a choice medium used by professionals all over the world. All that is required to keep the pastel painting safe is for it to be framed under glass, with a mat to keep it from contact with the glass, and a sealed paper backing. Ultraviolet radiation will affect any pigment in any media, so it is best to frame art with a UV protective glass. New kinds of glass and acrylics are available that are superior to the old non-glare glass and includes a UV screen --which is my preference for all my pastel paintings. I'll be happy to speak about any ideas or questions you might have concerning portraiture. I’ve learned how to make it a fun and fantastic experience for all concerned. Let’s get started!
On Saint Croix, in Christiansted above: working on an oil portrait at The TOP HAT GALLERY below: Much of my work at a show at The HENLE STUDIO FINE ART GALLERY